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Some a meme sticks around a while because it represents something timeless that continually rings true for people, such as parenthood.

Other memes are specific to a specific event or idea. Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins coined the word "meme" rhymes with "team" in his bestselling book The Selfish Gene.

While he had no idea of its future internet-related context, he used the word meme to describe an idea, behavior, or style that rapidly spreads from person to person in a culture.

In his book, he likened a meme's spread to that of a virus. The word meme came from the Greek word mimeme, which means imitated thing.

Decades later, Dawkins supported the appropriation of the word meme into the digital world. He said that the new meaning isn't that far from his original explanation.

Memes used to be the domain of somethings. However, internet users of all ages and all levels of digital savviness have adopted memes to express their feelings.

Memes are a worldwide social phenomenon. The more a meme resonates with people, the more they'll share it and the farther it will spread.

Memes are usually funny, but often that humor is injected with wry political or social commentary.

Sometimes memes exist for shock value or to teach a life lesson. Other times a single photo or short video will generate hundreds of hilarious interpretations.

Sometimes a meme will be appreciated by only a select group of people, and other times a meme will have near-universal appeal.

Here's a look at some popular meme categories and examples to give you a better idea of the breadth and scope of these viral statements. A meme can be a still photograph or an animated GIF , as long as the content appeals to others in a shareable format.

Popular memes are often funny, ranging from silly humor to niche humor to more pointed political humor. Kids, parenting, pets, and everyday life offer endless meme material.

Often one funny image spurs a host of memes, as with this determined-looking toddler clenching his hand into a fist.

The above meme mimics our determination on New Year's Eve to finally make positive changes. The same image represents our feelings of satisfaction and winning when we receive an unexpected windfall.

Some memes have pointed humor. These memes put forth an opinion, argue with others, take a provocative stance, or use darker subjects, such as the above meme that takes advantage of an unfortunate headline.

Social commentary colors many memes, touching upon subjects such as wine drinking, a hugely popular topic on the internet.

Often, memes tackle different takes on societal norms, such as memes about not wanting to have kids:.

In some cases, a meme achieves notoriety as a conversational expression. As in the above example, the phrase "Meanwhile in World events provide endless meme fodder, with humor that's sometimes pointed, sometimes silly, and sometimes painful.

As in the above meme, the COVID pandemic and its ensuing social isolation period generated thousands of memes, capitalizing on the dark humor of a shared experience.

Only the subjects with autism—who lack the degree of inferential capacity normally associated with aspects of theory of mind —came close to functioning as "meme machines".

In his book The Robot's Rebellion , Stanovich uses the memes and memeplex concepts to describe a program of cognitive reform that he refers to as a "rebellion".

Specifically, Stanovich argues that the use of memes as a descriptor for cultural units is beneficial because it serves to emphasize transmission and acquisition properties that parallel the study of epidemiology.

These properties make salient the sometimes parasitic nature of acquired memes, and as a result individuals should be motivated to reflectively acquire memes using what he calls a " Neurathian bootstrap " process.

Although social scientists such as Max Weber sought to understand and explain religion in terms of a cultural attribute, Richard Dawkins called for a re-analysis of religion in terms of the evolution of self-replicating ideas apart from any resulting biological advantages they might bestow.

As an enthusiastic Darwinian, I have been dissatisfied with explanations that my fellow-enthusiasts have offered for human behaviour.

They have tried to look for 'biological advantages' in various attributes of human civilization. For instance, tribal religion has been seen as a mechanism for solidifying group identity, valuable for a pack-hunting species whose individuals rely on cooperation to catch large and fast prey.

Frequently the evolutionary preconception in terms of which such theories are framed is implicitly group-selectionist, but it is possible to rephrase the theories in terms of orthodox gene selection.

He argued that the role of key replicator in cultural evolution belongs not to genes, but to memes replicating thought from person to person by means of imitation.

These replicators respond to selective pressures that may or may not affect biological reproduction or survival. Many of the features common to the most widely practiced religions provide built-in advantages in an evolutionary context, she writes.

For example, religions that preach of the value of faith over evidence from everyday experience or reason inoculate societies against many of the most basic tools people commonly use to evaluate their ideas.

By linking altruism with religious affiliation, religious memes can proliferate more quickly because people perceive that they can reap societal as well as personal rewards.

The longevity of religious memes improves with their documentation in revered religious texts. Aaron Lynch attributed the robustness of religious memes in human culture to the fact that such memes incorporate multiple modes of meme transmission.

Religious memes pass down the generations from parent to child and across a single generation through the meme-exchange of proselytism.

Most people will hold the religion taught them by their parents throughout their life. Many religions feature adversarial elements, punishing apostasy , for instance, or demonizing infidels.

In Thought Contagion Lynch identifies the memes of transmission in Christianity as especially powerful in scope. Believers view the conversion of non-believers both as a religious duty and as an act of altruism.

The promise of heaven to believers and threat of hell to non-believers provide a strong incentive for members to retain their belief.

Lynch asserts that belief in the Crucifixion of Jesus in Christianity amplifies each of its other replication advantages through the indebtedness believers have to their Savior for sacrifice on the cross.

The image of the crucifixion recurs in religious sacraments , and the proliferation of symbols of the cross in homes and churches potently reinforces the wide array of Christian memes.

Although religious memes have proliferated in human cultures, the modern scientific community has been relatively resistant to religious belief.

Robertson [49] reasoned that if evolution is accelerated in conditions of propagative difficulty, [50] then we would expect to encounter variations of religious memes, established in general populations, addressed to scientific communities.

Using a memetic approach, Robertson deconstructed two attempts to privilege religiously held spirituality in scientific discourse.

Advantages of a memetic approach as compared to more traditional "modernization" and "supply side" theses in understanding the evolution and propagation of religion were explored.

In Cultural Software: A Theory of Ideology , Jack Balkin argued that memetic processes can explain many of the most familiar features of ideological thought.

His theory of "cultural software" maintained that memes form narratives , social networks, metaphoric and metonymic models, and a variety of different mental structures.

Balkin maintains that the same structures used to generate ideas about free speech or free markets also serve to generate racistic beliefs.

To Balkin, whether memes become harmful or maladaptive depends on the environmental context in which they exist rather than in any special source or manner to their origination.

Balkin describes racist beliefs as "fantasy" memes that become harmful or unjust "ideologies" when diverse peoples come together, as through trade or competition.

In A Theory of Architecture , Nikos Salingaros speaks of memes as "freely propagating clusters of information" which can be beneficial or harmful.

He contrasts memes to patterns and true knowledge, characterizing memes as "greatly simplified versions of patterns" and as "unreasoned matching to some visual or mnemonic prototype".

Architectural memes, according to Salingaros, can have destructive power. They lack connection and meaning, thereby preventing "the creation of true connections necessary to our understanding of the world".

He sees them as no different from antipatterns in software design—as solutions that are false but are re-utilized nonetheless.

An "Internet meme" is a concept that spreads rapidly from person to person via the Internet , largely through Internet-based E-mailing , blogs , forums , imageboards like 4chan , social networking sites like Facebook , Instagram , or Twitter , instant messaging , social news sites or thread sites like Reddit , and video hosting services like YouTube and Twitch.

In , Richard Dawkins characterized an Internet meme as one deliberately altered by human creativity, distinguished from Dawkins's original idea involving mutation "by random change and a form of Darwinian selection".

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Not to be confused with Mime. This article is about the term "meme" in general.

For the usage of the term on the internet or a trend that spreads quickly , see Internet meme. For other uses, see Meme disambiguation.

Thought or idea that can be shared, in analogy to a gene. Outline History. Archaeological Biological Cultural Linguistic Social.

Social Cultural. Research framework. Key concepts. Key theories. Actor—network theory Alliance theory Cross-cultural studies Cultural materialism Culture theory Diffusionism Feminism Historical particularism Boasian anthropology Functionalism Interpretive Performance studies Political economy Practice theory Structuralism Post-structuralism Systems theory.

Anthropologists by nationality Anthropology by year Bibliography Journals List of indigenous peoples Organizations. See also: Diffusion of innovations.

Main article: Memetics. See also: Evolutionary psychology of religion. Main article: Internet meme.

See also: List of Internet phenomena. Oxford Dictionaries. Archived from the original on Retrieved Cambridge Dictionary.

Oxford Learner's Dictionaries. Merriam-Webster Dictionary. As Richard Dawkins has shown, systems of self-replicating ideas or memes can quickly accumulate their own agenda and behaviours.

I assign no higher motive to a cultural entity than the primitive drive to reproduce itself and modify its environment to aid its spread.

One way the self organizing system can do this is by consuming human biological resources. Memes and narrative analysis: A potential direction for the development of neo-Darwinian orientated research in organisations.

European Academy of Management. Perspectives on Science. This is an open access article, made freely available courtesy of MIT Press.

I hope my classicist friends will forgive me if I abbreviate mimeme to meme. It should be pronounced to rhyme with 'cream'. Research Previews 2 pp.

Also presented at the November, annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Cullen, J. The Selfish Gene 30th Anniversary Edition 3rd ed.

Oxford University Press. Center for the Study of Complex Systems. University of Michigan. Retrieved 14 August Journal of Memetics.

Principia Cybernetica. Retrieved 26 July Evers, John. We may say that certain memes are contagious, or more contagious than others.

Online version retrieved The Guardian. The Semiotic Review of Books. European Journal for Semiotic Studies.

Bibcode : PNAS University Of Chicago Press. USA Today. Wired UK. Archived from the original on July 9, This audio file was created from a revision of the article " Meme " dated , and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article.

Audio help. More spoken articles. Richard Dawkins. Bibliography Political views. Growing Up in the Universe Dawkins vs. Book Category.

Activism Argument Argumentum ad populum Attitude change Censorship Charisma Circular reporting Cognitive dissonance Critical thinking Crowd manipulation Cultural dissonance Deprogramming Echo chamber Education religious , values Euphemism Excommunication Fearmongering Historical revisionism Ideological repression Indoctrination Media manipulation Media regulation Mind control Missionaries Moral entrepreneurship Persuasion Polite fiction Political engineering Propaganda Propaganda model Proselytism Psychological manipulation Psychological warfare Religious conversion forced Religious persecution Religious uniformity Revolutions Rhetoric Self-censorship Social change Social control Social engineering Social influence Social progress Suppression of dissent Systemic bias Woozle effect.

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Nihilism Optimism Pessimism Reclusion Weltschmerz. Society portal. Categories : Memes Abstraction Collective intelligence Concepts Concepts in epistemology Concepts in the philosophy of mind Concepts in the philosophy of science Cultural anthropology Emergence Epistemology Evolution Evolutionary psychology History of education History of ideas History of philosophy History of science Intelligence Metaphysics of mind Mind Philosophical concepts Philosophical theories Philosophy of education Philosophy of language Philosophy of mind Philosophy of science Words coined in the s Words and phrases introduced in Hidden categories: Harv and Sfn no-target errors Harv and Sfn multiple-target errors CS1: long volume value Wikipedia pages semi-protected against vandalism Articles with short description All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from May All articles with specifically marked weasel-worded phrases Articles with specifically marked weasel-worded phrases from May Articles containing Ancient Greek-language text Articles containing Greek-language text Articles with hAudio microformats Wikipedia articles needing clarification from February Articles with unsourced statements from December Spoken articles Commons category link is on Wikidata.

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Download as PDF Printable version.

Here's a deeper look into what exactly a meme is, the different types of memes, and some meme examples. Some a meme sticks around a while because it represents something timeless that continually rings true for people, such as parenthood.

Other memes are specific to a specific event or idea. Evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins coined the word "meme" rhymes with "team" in his bestselling book The Selfish Gene.

While he had no idea of its future internet-related context, he used the word meme to describe an idea, behavior, or style that rapidly spreads from person to person in a culture.

In his book, he likened a meme's spread to that of a virus. The word meme came from the Greek word mimeme, which means imitated thing.

Decades later, Dawkins supported the appropriation of the word meme into the digital world.

He said that the new meaning isn't that far from his original explanation. Memes used to be the domain of somethings.

However, internet users of all ages and all levels of digital savviness have adopted memes to express their feelings. Memes are a worldwide social phenomenon.

The more a meme resonates with people, the more they'll share it and the farther it will spread. Memes are usually funny, but often that humor is injected with wry political or social commentary.

Sometimes memes exist for shock value or to teach a life lesson. Other times a single photo or short video will generate hundreds of hilarious interpretations.

Sometimes a meme will be appreciated by only a select group of people, and other times a meme will have near-universal appeal.

Here's a look at some popular meme categories and examples to give you a better idea of the breadth and scope of these viral statements.

A meme can be a still photograph or an animated GIF , as long as the content appeals to others in a shareable format. Popular memes are often funny, ranging from silly humor to niche humor to more pointed political humor.

Kids, parenting, pets, and everyday life offer endless meme material. Often one funny image spurs a host of memes, as with this determined-looking toddler clenching his hand into a fist.

The above meme mimics our determination on New Year's Eve to finally make positive changes. The same image represents our feelings of satisfaction and winning when we receive an unexpected windfall.

Some memes have pointed humor. These memes put forth an opinion, argue with others, take a provocative stance, or use darker subjects, such as the above meme that takes advantage of an unfortunate headline.

Social commentary colors many memes, touching upon subjects such as wine drinking, a hugely popular topic on the internet. Often, memes tackle different takes on societal norms, such as memes about not wanting to have kids:.

In some cases, a meme achieves notoriety as a conversational expression. As in the above example, the phrase "Meanwhile in World events provide endless meme fodder, with humor that's sometimes pointed, sometimes silly, and sometimes painful.

This forms an analogy to the idea of a gene as a single unit of self-replicating information found on the self-replicating chromosome.

While the identification of memes as "units" conveys their nature to replicate as discrete, indivisible entities, it does not imply that thoughts somehow become quantized or that " atomic " ideas exist that cannot be dissected into smaller pieces.

A meme has no given size. Susan Blackmore writes that melodies from Beethoven 's symphonies are commonly used to illustrate the difficulty involved in delimiting memes as discrete units.

The inability to pin an idea or cultural feature to quantifiable key units is widely acknowledged as a problem for memetics.

It has been argued however that the traces of memetic processing can be quantified utilizing neuroimaging techniques which measure changes in the connectivity profiles between brain regions.

To illustrate, she notes evolution selects for the gene for features such as eye color; it does not select for the individual nucleotide in a strand of DNA.

Memes play a comparable role in understanding the evolution of imitated behaviors. Lumsden and E. Wilson proposed the theory that genes and culture co-evolve, and that the fundamental biological units of culture must correspond to neuronal networks that function as nodes of semantic memory.

They coined their own word, " culturgen ", which did not catch on. Coauthor Wilson later acknowledged the term meme as the best label for the fundamental unit of cultural inheritance in his book Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge , which elaborates upon the fundamental role of memes in unifying the natural and social sciences.

Dawkins noted the three conditions that must exist for evolution to occur: [34]. Dawkins emphasizes that the process of evolution naturally occurs whenever these conditions co-exist, and that evolution does not apply only to organic elements such as genes.

He regards memes as also having the properties necessary for evolution, and thus sees meme evolution as not simply analogous to genetic evolution, but as a real phenomenon subject to the laws of natural selection.

Dawkins noted that as various ideas pass from one generation to the next, they may either enhance or detract from the survival of the people who obtain those ideas, or influence the survival of the ideas themselves.

For example, a certain culture may develop unique designs and methods of tool -making that give it a competitive advantage over another culture.

Each tool-design thus acts somewhat similarly to a biological gene in that some populations have it and others do not, and the meme's function directly affects the presence of the design in future generations.

In keeping with the thesis that in evolution one can regard organisms simply as suitable "hosts" for reproducing genes, Dawkins argues that one can view people as "hosts" for replicating memes.

Consequently, a successful meme may or may not need to provide any benefit to its host. Unlike genetic evolution, memetic evolution can show both Darwinian and Lamarckian traits.

Cultural memes will have the characteristic of Lamarckian inheritance when a host aspires to replicate the given meme through inference rather than by exactly copying it.

Take for example the case of the transmission of a simple skill such as hammering a nail, a skill that a learner imitates from watching a demonstration without necessarily imitating every discrete movement modeled by the teacher in the demonstration, stroke for stroke.

Clusters of memes, or memeplexes also known as meme complexes or as memecomplexes , such as cultural or political doctrines and systems, may also play a part in the acceptance of new memes.

Memeplexes comprise groups of memes that replicate together and coadapt. As an example, John D. Gottsch discusses the transmission, mutation and selection of religious memeplexes and the theistic memes contained.

Similar memes are thereby included in the majority of religious memeplexes, and harden over time; they become an "inviolable canon" or set of dogmas , eventually finding their way into secular law.

This could also be referred to as the propagation of a taboo. The discipline of memetics, which dates from the mids, provides an approach to evolutionary models of cultural information transfer based on the concept of the meme.

Memeticists have proposed that just as memes function analogously to genes , memetics functions analogously to genetics.

Memetics attempts to apply conventional scientific methods such as those used in population genetics and epidemiology to explain existing patterns and transmission of cultural ideas.

Principal criticisms of memetics include the claim that memetics ignores established advances in other fields of cultural study, such as sociology , cultural anthropology , cognitive psychology , and social psychology.

Questions remain whether or not the meme concept counts as a validly disprovable scientific theory. This view regards memetics as a theory in its infancy: a protoscience to proponents, or a pseudoscience to some detractors.

There seems no reason to think that the same balance will exist in the selection pressures on memes.

Luis Benitez-Bribiesca M. As a factual criticism, Benitez-Bribiesca points to the lack of a "code script" for memes analogous to the DNA of genes , and to the excessive instability of the meme mutation mechanism that of an idea going from one brain to another , which would lead to a low replication accuracy and a high mutation rate, rendering the evolutionary process chaotic.

British political philosopher John Gray has characterized Dawkins's memetic theory of religion as "nonsense" and "not even a theory Another critique comes from semiotic theorists such as Deacon [40] and Kull.

The meme is thus described in memetics as a sign lacking a triadic nature. Semioticians can regard a meme as a "degenerate" sign, which includes only its ability of being copied.

Accordingly, in the broadest sense, the objects of copying are memes, whereas the objects of translation and interpretation are signs.

Fracchia and Lewontin regard memetics as reductionist and inadequate. Opinions differ as to how best to apply the concept of memes within a "proper" disciplinary framework.

One view sees memes as providing a useful philosophical perspective with which to examine cultural evolution. Proponents of this view such as Susan Blackmore and Daniel Dennett argue that considering cultural developments from a meme's-eye view— as if memes themselves respond to pressure to maximise their own replication and survival—can lead to useful insights and yield valuable predictions into how culture develops over time.

Others such as Bruce Edmonds and Robert Aunger have focused on the need to provide an empirical grounding for memetics to become a useful and respected scientific discipline.

A third approach, described by Joseph Poulshock, as "radical memetics" seeks to place memes at the centre of a materialistic theory of mind and of personal identity.

Prominent researchers in evolutionary psychology and anthropology , including Scott Atran , Dan Sperber , Pascal Boyer , John Tooby and others, argue the possibility of incompatibility between modularity of mind and memetics.

Atran discusses communication involving religious beliefs as a case in point. In one set of experiments he asked religious people to write down on a piece of paper the meanings of the Ten Commandments.

Despite the subjects' own expectations of consensus, interpretations of the commandments showed wide ranges of variation, with little evidence of consensus.

In another experiment, subjects with autism and subjects without autism interpreted ideological and religious sayings for example, "Let a thousand flowers bloom" or "To everything there is a season".

People with autism showed a significant tendency to closely paraphrase and repeat content from the original statement for example: "Don't cut flowers before they bloom".

Controls tended to infer a wider range of cultural meanings with little replicated content for example: "Go with the flow" or "Everyone should have equal opportunity".

Only the subjects with autism—who lack the degree of inferential capacity normally associated with aspects of theory of mind —came close to functioning as "meme machines".

In his book The Robot's Rebellion , Stanovich uses the memes and memeplex concepts to describe a program of cognitive reform that he refers to as a "rebellion".

Specifically, Stanovich argues that the use of memes as a descriptor for cultural units is beneficial because it serves to emphasize transmission and acquisition properties that parallel the study of epidemiology.

These properties make salient the sometimes parasitic nature of acquired memes, and as a result individuals should be motivated to reflectively acquire memes using what he calls a " Neurathian bootstrap " process.

Although social scientists such as Max Weber sought to understand and explain religion in terms of a cultural attribute, Richard Dawkins called for a re-analysis of religion in terms of the evolution of self-replicating ideas apart from any resulting biological advantages they might bestow.

As an enthusiastic Darwinian, I have been dissatisfied with explanations that my fellow-enthusiasts have offered for human behaviour.

They have tried to look for 'biological advantages' in various attributes of human civilization. For instance, tribal religion has been seen as a mechanism for solidifying group identity, valuable for a pack-hunting species whose individuals rely on cooperation to catch large and fast prey.

Frequently the evolutionary preconception in terms of which such theories are framed is implicitly group-selectionist, but it is possible to rephrase the theories in terms of orthodox gene selection.

He argued that the role of key replicator in cultural evolution belongs not to genes, but to memes replicating thought from person to person by means of imitation.

These replicators respond to selective pressures that may or may not affect biological reproduction or survival.

Many of the features common to the most widely practiced religions provide built-in advantages in an evolutionary context, she writes.

For example, religions that preach of the value of faith over evidence from everyday experience or reason inoculate societies against many of the most basic tools people commonly use to evaluate their ideas.

By linking altruism with religious affiliation, religious memes can proliferate more quickly because people perceive that they can reap societal as well as personal rewards.

The longevity of religious memes improves with their documentation in revered religious texts. Aaron Lynch attributed the robustness of religious memes in human culture to the fact that such memes incorporate multiple modes of meme transmission.

Religious memes pass down the generations from parent to child and across a single generation through the meme-exchange of proselytism.

Most people will hold the religion taught them by their parents throughout their life. Many religions feature adversarial elements, punishing apostasy , for instance, or demonizing infidels.

In Thought Contagion Lynch identifies the memes of transmission in Christianity as especially powerful in scope.

Believers view the conversion of non-believers both as a religious duty and as an act of altruism. The promise of heaven to believers and threat of hell to non-believers provide a strong incentive for members to retain their belief.

Lynch asserts that belief in the Crucifixion of Jesus in Christianity amplifies each of its other replication advantages through the indebtedness believers have to their Savior for sacrifice on the cross.

The image of the crucifixion recurs in religious sacraments , and the proliferation of symbols of the cross in homes and churches potently reinforces the wide array of Christian memes.

Although religious memes have proliferated in human cultures, the modern scientific community has been relatively resistant to religious belief.

Robertson [49] reasoned that if evolution is accelerated in conditions of propagative difficulty, [50] then we would expect to encounter variations of religious memes, established in general populations, addressed to scientific communities.

Using a memetic approach, Robertson deconstructed two attempts to privilege religiously held spirituality in scientific discourse.

Advantages of a memetic approach as compared to more traditional "modernization" and "supply side" theses in understanding the evolution and propagation of religion were explored.

In Cultural Software: A Theory of Ideology , Jack Balkin argued that memetic processes can explain many of the most familiar features of ideological thought.

His theory of "cultural software" maintained that memes form narratives , social networks, metaphoric and metonymic models, and a variety of different mental structures.

Balkin maintains that the same structures used to generate ideas about free speech or free markets also serve to generate racistic beliefs.

To Balkin, whether memes become harmful or maladaptive depends on the environmental context in which they exist rather than in any special source or manner to their origination.

Balkin describes racist beliefs as "fantasy" memes that become harmful or unjust "ideologies" when diverse peoples come together, as through trade or competition.

In A Theory of Architecture , Nikos Salingaros speaks of memes as "freely propagating clusters of information" which can be beneficial or harmful.

He contrasts memes to patterns and true knowledge, characterizing memes as "greatly simplified versions of patterns" and as "unreasoned matching to some visual or mnemonic prototype".

Architectural memes, according to Salingaros, can have destructive power. They lack connection and meaning, thereby preventing "the creation of true connections necessary to our understanding of the world".

He sees them as no different from antipatterns in software design—as solutions that are false but are re-utilized nonetheless. An "Internet meme" is a concept that spreads rapidly from person to person via the Internet , largely through Internet-based E-mailing , blogs , forums , imageboards like 4chan , social networking sites like Facebook , Instagram , or Twitter , instant messaging , social news sites or thread sites like Reddit , and video hosting services like YouTube and Twitch.

In , Richard Dawkins characterized an Internet meme as one deliberately altered by human creativity, distinguished from Dawkins's original idea involving mutation "by random change and a form of Darwinian selection".

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Not to be confused with Mime. This article is about the term "meme" in general.

For the usage of the term on the internet or a trend that spreads quickly , see Internet meme. For other uses, see Meme disambiguation.

Thought or idea that can be shared, in analogy to a gene. Outline History. Archaeological Biological Cultural Linguistic Social.

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Main article: Memetics. See also: Evolutionary psychology of religion. Main article: Internet meme.